Catalog Archive
Auction 156, Lot 773

"Chart of the N.W. Coast of America and the N.E. Coast of Asia, Explored in the Years 1778 and 1779", Faden, William

Subject: North Pacific Ocean

Period: 1808 (dated)

Publication: General Atlas

Color: Hand Color

Size:
27 x 15.4 inches
68.6 x 39.1 cm

Captain James Cook (1728-1779) is best known for his three voyages to the Pacific (1768-71; 1772-75; and 1776-79). His discoveries radically changed the western understanding of the world in the late 18th century. He was the first to circumnavigate and chart New Zealand and provided the earliest European accounts of exploration along the eastern coast of Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. On February 14th, 1779, he was killed on Hawaii after attempting to kidnap the chief of the island.

Many contemporary accounts of Cook’s voyages, including charts and engravings, appeared in the late 18th century. The first official account of Cook’s first voyage was published in 1773 by John Hawkesworth in Volumes II and III of An Account of the Voyages Undertaken by the Order of His Present Majesty for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere... William Strahan and Thomas Cadell published the first official accounts of the second and third voyages in 1777 and 1784. Accounts of his exploration were subsequently translated into French, German, and Dutch.

This is the rare third state of this map published by Faden, dated 1808 in the note beneath the title and incorporating up-to-date information along the coast of America and inland in Russia and North America. It shows the coastline of northwestern North America and northeastern Asia, with particular emphasis on Bristol Bay north to the Bering Strait. The detail is focused on Cook's third and final expedition (1776-79), when he traveled up the northern reach of the Pacific in search of a Northwest Passage. His routes are traced and dated. Cook probed up along the Oregon coast in bad weather to Nootka Sound, where he rested and refitted his ships. They sailed forth to the Alaskan and Chukotskiy peninsulas and from there into the Bering Strait. Cook got as far north as 70° by 41° N before being forced back by the ice off Icy Cape. The expedition came south down the Russian coast and then east to Norton Sound. Cook's expedition then sailed south to Hawaii, where Cook was killed in a dispute with the natives. His second-in-command Clerke took over the expedition and they explored further in Hawaii before returning north to continue the exploration for the Northwest Passage. Engraved by William Palmer.

References: Kershaw #1192.

Condition: B+

A nice impression with a hint of offsetting and a light damp stain concentrated along the bottom of the centerfold. There are short edge tears confined to the wide blank margins.

Estimate: $750 - $900

Unsold

Closed on 2/17/2016

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