Auction 145, Lot 61

Earliest Example of a Loring Terrestrial Globe

"[18-inch Terrestrial Globe] Loring's Terrestrial Globe Containing All the Late Discoveries and Geographical Improvements...", Loring, Josiah

Subject: Globes

Period: 1832 (dated)

Publication:

Color: Hand Color

Size:
25 x 44 inches
63.5 x 111.8 cm

This stunning eighteen-inch floor globe is one of the earliest, if not the earliest, terrestrial globes sold by Josiah Loring. According to the David Rumsey Map Collection, the earliest Loring terrestrial globe was produced in 1833, but here the title cartouche dates the globe to 1832. Many of Loring’s early globes were imported by Charles Smith in London, and this example bears title cartouches for both Loring and C. Smith & Son. Smith’s cartouche is in the more traditional location in the northern Pacific Ocean west of the analemma, while Loring’s cartouche occupies the southern Pacific Ocean. Beginning in 1833, the Loring cartouche replaces that of Smith & Son.
The globe shows excellent detail of the voyages of famous navigators including Cook, Vancouver and La Perouse. Geographically, Mexico is in control of the southwest with the boundary to the north based upon the 1819 Adams-Onis treaty. Central and western America are dominated by Missouri Territory and the Northwest Territory. The Pacific Northwest is labeled New Albion and New Georgia, reflecting British claims in the area. This clearly indicates that, while Loring put his name on the globe, he had not had time to re-engrave the gores to reflect United States interests. Floating in the Pacific are the circular title cartouche and a large analemma.

The two globe cartouches read as follows:

"Smith’s/ Terrestrial Globe/ Containing the whole of/ The Latest Discoveries/ And/ Geographical Improvements/ also the Tracks of/ the most celebrated Circumnavigators/ London/ C. Smith & Son 172 Strand."

"Loring’s/ Terrestrial Globe/ Containing all the Late Discoveries/ And/ Geographical Improvements,/ also the Tracks of/ the most celebrated Circumnavigators/ Compiled from Smith’s New English Globe with/ additions and improvements by Annin & Smith/ Boston/ Josiah Loring 136 Washington St 1832."

This is an extremely rare and beautiful find from one of America’s earliest globe makers.

References: cf. Rumsey #2899.000

Condition: B+

This beautiful globe with original color has benefited from professional restoration. There is a long crack that extends from Africa, following the equator, to the analemma (approximately halfway around the globe) that has been expertly repaired. There is also a small 3" crack close to the South Pole and three 0.25" diameter areas of gore loss just west of Virginia, west of Korea, and in Northern Russia. The globe has some other minor cracks, dings and small stains which is typical for a globe of this age, and has been professionally revarnished. The stand and meridian are in very good condition, and the stand is original with original finish. The meridian is good with several small areas of loss retouched in facsimile.