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Auction 161
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goto detail pageReserve lowered by $1000! Rare First Block of Munster's World Map

Lot 2.  (General Tafel Begreifend der Gantzen Undern Weldt Beschreibung), Munster, [1548 ]. Rare first block of Munster's 'modern' map of the world presented on an oval projection surrounded by vigorous clouds and wind heads. North America is shown with the large cleft nearly separating the east coast from the continent, often referred to as the Sea of Verrazano, and a Northwest Passage stretches towards Asia with a note in Latin that it leads to the Moluccas. The lands in the Arctic are all joined together in one large promontory that includes Iceland and Scandinavia with the name of Terra Nova sive Bacalhos. Terra Florida and Francisca are the only place names on the eastern portion of North America, while the western coast is filled with the name of Temistitian. South America is shown in an ungainly shape labeled America seu Insula Braslii, with the Strait of Magellan noted below. In Africa, the Nile is prominently shown with its twin sources beginning in a range of southern mountains. The mythical islands of Grisonum and Calensuan are placed in the proximity of Australia. The Pacific Ocean is named for the first time on a printed map as the Mare Pacificum. Zipangri is noted for Japan, and the island of Taprobana (Sri Lanka) is named off the coast of India. A sailing ship and several fierce sea monsters occupy the oceans. German text on verso along with an elaborate woodcut illustration. This map was first published in the 1540 edition of Munster's Geographia, and then subsequently in the 1541, 1542, and 1545 editions, all in Latin. Munster also included this map in his Cosmographia, and this was the first of three blocks that appeared in the Cosmographia, appearing only in the German editions of 1544, 1545, 1546, and 1548 before it was replaced by a newly engraved block. As a result, this map is quite rare and not often found on the market.

See also lot 56 for the matching western hemisphere map from the 1548 edition of Munster's Cosmographia.(B+ ). Estimate: $5,500.00 - $7,000.00

goto detail pageOrtelius' Third World Map in an Oval Projection

Lot 5.  (Typus Orbis Terrarum), Ortelius, 1587 . Ortelius' beautiful oval world map is a simplified version of Mercator's influential map of 1569. From surviving correspondence, it is known that Mercator encouraged Ortelius and provided him with information, particularly with co-ordinates of places in the Americas. This is the first state of Ortelius' third world map updated with the more correct shape of South America and the first depiction of the Solomon Islands off the coast of New Guinea. North America is nearly bisected by a lengthy St. Lawrence River, and the lands of Anian Regnum and Quivira are noted on the western coast. The Atlantic Ocean is filled with phantom islands, including Frieslant, St. Brandain, Brasil and many others. A huge Southern Continent incorporates Tierra del Fuego, and the mythical lands of Beach, Maletur and Lucach. The oval projection is surrounded by an intricate strapwork design with four corner medallions containing quotations from Cicero and Seneca. Latin text on verso, published in 1595.

See also lot 812 for two reference books on Ortelius and his atlas maps.(B+ ). Estimate: $6,000.00 - $7,500.00

goto detail pageRare, Early Spanish Map of the World

Lot 7.  (Tipus Orbis Terrarum), de Solis, ca. 1603 . This striking map is from a rare Spanish translation of Botero’s geographical and political commentary. Thus it is one of the few maps to be published in Spain during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The map is based on the work of Abraham Ortelius. It depicts the earlier portrayal of the Americas, including the characteristic bulge in South America, but with the strapwork surround and medallion design of Ortelius' later maps. North America is elongated with an apparent Sea of Verazzano connecting to a convenient Northwest Passage below the Arctic, shown with the four rivers flowing from the North Pole derived from Mercator's map. The Atlantic is filled with fictitious islands, including Frislant, S. Brandan, Brasil, and Sept cices. The huge southern continent of Tierra Austra Aunno Conocida is dotted with names from the explorations of Marco Polo, including Beach, Lucach and Maletur. Tierra del Fuego is included in the southern continent, and New Guinea is shown as an oversized island off its coastline.(B ). Estimate: $3,000.00 - $4,000.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $1000! Rare Blank Verso

Lot 8.  (Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula), Blaeu, ca. 1635 . A magnificent map featuring a carte-a-figures border with allegorical representations of the sun, the moon, the five known planets, the four elements and the four seasons. Along the bottom are vignettes showing the seven wonders of the world: the Hanging Gardens of Babylon; the Colossus straddling the harbor at Rhodes; the Pyramids; the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus in Bodrum, Turkey; the Temple of Diana; the Statue of Jupiter; and the lighthouse at Alexandria. Josua van Ende engraved this map, reducing it from Blaeu's 1605 wall map for inclusion in atlases.

Petrus Plancius' world map of 1592 was the main source of geographical information. The map is shown on Mercator's projection with a massive Southern Continent attached to New Guinea, with the coastal names of Beach and Psittacorum regio noted from Marco Polo's travel memoirs. North America has the westward bulge characteristic of the time, with the Strait of Anian noted. Korea is shown as an island and Japan is in a kite-like shape. The map itself is richly decorated with cartouches, sea battles, monsters and compass roses. Fourth state with Tierra del Fuego shown as an island and the date omitted from the lower cartouche on the right. Blank verso.(B+ ). Estimate: $9,500.00 - $11,000.00

goto detail pageGorgeous Map Showing Captain Cook's Routes

Lot 26.  ([On 2 Sheets] Generalkarte Soemmtlicher Entdeckungen auf den drei Grossen Weltreisen des Kapit. Jakob Cook. Verflast von Herrn Heinrich Roberts…), Schraembl, 1789 . This large, two-sheet map of the world is presented on Mercator's Projection. It marks the routes taken by Captain Cook on his three expeditions, centered on the Pacific Ocean, where Cook's most important discoveries were made. The map is based on the important map by Lieutenant Henry Roberts, who compiled the surveys for the official account of the voyage. The tracks detail the voyages, each distinguished by a different color, with dates of important discoveries noted. Two sheets, unjoined, as issued; dimensions are for each sheet.(A+ ). Estimate: $1,400.00 - $1,700.00

goto detail pageJansson's Famous Peutinger Table

Lot 36.  ([On 4 Sheets] Tabula Itineraria ex Illustri Peutingerorum Bibliotheca...), Jansson, [1662 ]. Four sheets making up the famous Peutinger Table, or a Roman road map of the world. The original parchment document was found by Konrad Celtes in a library in Augsburg, came into the hands of Konrad Peutinger and later went to his relative Mark Welser who was the first to publish a copy of it in 1591 at Aldus Manutius in Venice. These maps, based on the original manuscript, were first popularized by Ortelius in 1598 and became an important part of his great historical atlas. Jansson's version is nearly identical to that of Ortelius. These decorative maps, in a sequence of four plates, each with two strip maps, depict the imperial roads and posts within the Roman Empire throughout Europe, North Africa and Asia as far as Toprobana (Sri Lanka). Latin text on verso.(B ). Estimate: $2,500.00 - $3,250.00

goto detail pageSeutter's Striking Celestial Chart

Lot 43.  (Planisphaerium Coeleste Secundum Restitutionem Hevelianam et Hallejanam), Seutter, ca. 1745 . The choice and style of constellations making up the central map are derived from Hevelius. The celestial charts are set in a background of clouds inset with seven diagrams. At bottom (from left to right) are the monthly orbit of the moon, the Tychonic, Copernican, and Ptolemaic planetary hypotheses, and the relation between the annual orbit of the sun and the seasons. In the upper left corner a diagram represents day and night on the earth, with quotations from Genesis. The diagram in the upper right shows the monthly orbit and illumination of the moon. At center top is a superb engraving showing an ascending Christ surrounded by angels. There is no engraver's imprint.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $1,900.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced by $250! Gorgeous Swedish Terrestrial Globe

Lot 47.  ([13" Terrestrial Globe]), Anonymous, ca. 1904 . This thirteen-inch terrestrial desk globe is raised on a circular fruitwood base with a brass half-meridian ring supported by an ebonized baluster. The globe consists of twelve printed color gores and two polar calottes and stands 21" tall. The globe is dated circa 1905 showing an independent Panama (1903), Athabasca and Assiniboia districts in Canada (consolidated into Alberta and Saskatchewan in 1905), and separate Oklahoma & Indian territories (merged in 1907). The gores show political boundaries, cities, rivers, mountains, and numerous shipping lanes in the oceans. It oddly does not delineate Washington state, with Oregon occupying the entire Pacific Northwest. There is no publisher indicated on the gores, but the text is in Swedish.

See also lot 805 for Stevenson's 2-volume reference work on globes.(A ). Estimate: $1,100.00 - $1,400.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced by $500! Rare Early State of One of the Most Important 16th Century Maps of the New World

Lot 56.  (Die Neuwe Inselen / so zu Unsern Zeiten Durch die Kunig von Hispania im Grossen Oceano Gefunden Sindt), Munster, [1548 ]. This map of the New World is often credited with popularizing the name America due to the popularity of Munster's Cosmographia and the numerous editions published in the sixteenth century. The influence of Marco Polo's 13th century explorations in Asia are evident with the 7448 islands in the North Pacific and Zipangri (Japan) shown only a short distance off the western coast of North America. The North American continent is very oddly shaped without a California landmass and the eastern region is nearly bisected by a body of water, known as the Sea of Verrazzano. The Yucatan is still shown as an island, Cozumel is named nearby as Cozumela, and the lake at Temistitan is connected to the Gulf of Mexico. South America has a large bulge on the western coast, the Amazon River is very short, and cannibals inhabit the continent shown with the name Canibali next to a gruesome vignette with human limbs. The map is very decorative with Magellan's surviving ship Victoria appearing in the Pacific. The flags of Spain and Portugal depict their respective spheres of influence in the New World. On verso is an alternate German title (Die Newe Weldt der Grossen unnd Vilen Inselen von den Spaniern Gefunden) set within an architectural surround. This is the rare and early fourth state of this map according to Burden (and the third state according to Kershaw).

See also lot 2 for the matching world map from the 1548 edition of Munster's Cosmographia, and lot 827 for Kershaw's 4-volume reference work on the mapping of Canada, which references this map.(B+ ). Estimate: $4,750.00 - $6,000.00

goto detail pageHondius' Important Map of the Americas in Full Original Color

Lot 57.  (America), Hondius, [1619 ]. Jodocus Hondius' map of the Americas is one of the most elaborate examples of fine Dutch cartography. The decorations, including sea monsters, indigenous birds, native canoes and sailing vessels, are taken from De Bry's Grand Voyages. Particularly notable is the scene of natives preparing an intoxicating drink made from manioc roots, which is derived from Hans Staden's harrowing venture into Brazil. The continents are presented on a stereographic projection, which was becoming increasingly popular at the beginning on the 17th century. It presents a more correct western coastline of South America and narrows the breadth of Mexico. However, North America is still too broad and Virginia has an exaggerated coastline. Newfoundland is based on Plancius. The coastlines are fully engraved with place names.(B ). Estimate: $3,000.00 - $3,750.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $200! Mercator's Foundation Map for the Americas

Lot 58.  (America sive India Nova, ad Magnae Gerardi Mercatoris aui Universalis Imitationem, in Compendium Redacta), Mercator/Hondius, [1623 ]. This is one of the most famous maps of the Americas and an important foundation map for an American map collection. After the death of his grandfather, Michael Mercator produced this stunning hemispherical map, the only known printed map attributed to him. The map is surrounded by a beautifully engraved floral design and four roundels, one of which contains the title. The other insets include the Gulf of Mexico, Cuba, and Haiti. The geography was patterned after Rumold Mercator's world map of 1587, with a little added detail. There is a large inland lake in Canada, and the St Lawrence River extends nearly halfway across the continent with no Great Lakes. There is a still a bulge in the west coast of South America. The large southern continent extends above the Tropic of Capricorn in the Pacific where there is a very large island of New Guinea. Above North America are two of the four islands of the North Pole, with the great mythical rivers flowing from the pole. The seas are full of mythical islands, including St. Brendain, Frislant and Sept citez. Latin text on verso.(B ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pageSpeed's Popular Carte-a-Figures Map of the Americas - First State

Lot 59.  (America with Those Known Parts in That Unknowne Worlde Both People and Manner of Buildings Discribed and Inlarged), Speed, 1626 . This English map of the Americas is the earliest folio atlas map to depict California as an island, thus propagating one of the most enduring cartographic myths. It is also significant for its accurate depiction of the coast between Chesapeake and Cape Cod, and early portrayal of the English colonies, Iames Citti (Jamestown) and Plymouth. Boston and Long Island are not shown. The spurious islands of Brasil and Frisland still appear in the Atlantic. An inset map shows Greenland and Iceland. The map is the superb workmanship of the Dutch engraver, Abraham Goos. It is decorated in the popular carte-a-figures style with panels of costumed native figures at each side and vignettes of major cities at top. The figures at left represent the native people of North America, and at right the major South American tribes. The cities illustrated include Havana, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Cusco, and other important South American settlements. A number of sea monsters, flying fish and sailing ships also decorate the map. Dated in the cartouche 1626, published in either the 1627 or 1631 editions with the imprint of George Humble in the cartouche below title. English text on verso.(A ). Estimate: $7,000.00 - $8,500.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced by $500!

Lot 74.  (A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, Divided Into North and South and West Indies ... Wherein Are Exactly Described the United States of North America...), Sayer, 1786 . This impressive, large-scale map of North and South America was originally drawn by John Gibson in 1763 with a slightly different title. The map went through several revisions; this is the fifth state, with the title amended to indicate the newly formed "United States of America." The new country is marked with a dotted western boundary along the Mississippi River. The huge map is filled with incredible detail and is based on D'Anville's cartography, as well as Spanish explorations on the west coast of North America and the journals of Governor Pownall in New England and Canada. In the west are two possible locations for a River of the West; one with its source at Pike's Lake, the other further north at Lake Winnipeg. A Chinese colony, Fou Sang is shown in present-day British Columbia, just north of a notation concerning the Sea of the West. At lower left is an inset map of Hudson and Baffin's Bay. Above the inset are tables listing the states in the US and the colonial possessions of the various European powers. The baroque-style title cartouche features a beaver, a crocodile and an Indian headdress amid trees, a waterfall and tropical flora. This state is nearly identical to the fourth state, in which the Articles of the Treaty of Paris of 1763 were removed, and the shape of California was improved, with several place names added along the coast in the Pacific Northwest. Printed on four sheets, joined.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,400.00

goto detail pageOne of the Earliest Maps Devoted to North America

Lot 83.  (Novi Orbis pars Borealis, America Scilicet, Complectens Floridam, Baccalaon, Canadam, Terram Corterialem...), Quad, ca. 1600 . Very unusual map based on Cornelis de Jode's Americae Pars Borealis. It makes use of both John White and Jacques le Moyne's east coast cartography, but continues de Jode's inaccurate depiction of Virginia. Charlesfort is shown on the r. de Gallo with St. Helena just to the south. In the north is a Northwest Passage, and in the center is the Lago de Conibas. To the west of Florida is a curious second peninsula named Apalaco. The map is fully engraved with mountains, forests and cities with numerous notations throughout. Below the map is a panel of Latin text describing the various explorations. Engraved by Johannes Bussemacher. Blank verso.(A ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pageOne of the Most Important Maps Perpetuating the Myth of the Island of California

Lot 85.  (America Septentrionalis), Hondius/Jansson, ca. 1644 . Due to its wide distribution by one of the preeminent Dutch mapmakers, this important map of North America had great influence in perpetuating the theory of California as an island. The map is a careful compilation of various sources and represents the state of cartographic knowledge at the time. The insular California is derived directly from Henry Briggs, as is the depiction of the Arctic. A great number of place names are revealed on California, including po. de S. Diego (San Diego) and Po. Sir Francisco Draco (San Francisco). The Rio del Norto (Rio Grande) originates in a large western lake and flows incorrectly into the Mare Vermio (Gulf of California). The cartography of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida is based on Hessel Gerritsz. On the east coast the region identified as Novum Belgium is greatly elongated; Iames Towne and a few place names from John Smith's map appear in Nova Anglia. There is a single Lac des Iroquois in the Great Lakes region. The map is richly embellished with a variety of animals throughout the interior. The oceans are teeming with ships and sea monsters. The title cartouche features several Native Americans and two comely mermaids flank the imprint cartouche. This is the second state with Jansson's imprint. German text on verso, published between 1644-58.(A ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pageSanson's Two-Sheet Map Showing the Island of California

Lot 87.  (Amerique Septentrionale Divisee en ses Principales Parties, ou sont Distingues les uns des Autres les Estats...), Sanson/Mortier, ca. 1700 . This beautiful map of the Americas shows California as an island in the style of the second Sanson model (1656) with the indented northern coastline. A small peninsula Agubela de Gato is the only part of the Pacific coastline shown north of California. A strip of Terre de Jesso is shown in the Pacific immediately west of northern California. Santa Fe is shown along the R. del Norte (Rio Grande River), but the river erroneously drains into the Gulf of California. The two western Great Lakes are open-ended, and Lake Erie is too far south, split by the 40th parallel. The eastern part of the continent is divided into Nouvelle France and Floride with Virginia, New Sweden, New Amsterdam and New England hugging the coast. The decorative title cartouche is adorned with the arms of the Dauphine, two natives and tropical birds. This is the third state, with the imprint changed to Pierre Mortier within the distance scales cartouche. On two sheets, joined.(A ). Estimate: $2,500.00 - $3,250.00

goto detail pageIndex Sheet of Popple's Map

Lot 120.  (A Map of the British Empire in America with the French, Spanish and the Dutch Settlements Adjacent Thereto), Popple/Covens & Mortier, ca. 1741 . This is the index sheet of the Dutch version of Henry Popple's important map of the British Empire in North America, published by Covens and Mortier. Popple's map is the finest and most detailed map of America of its time and covers the eastern part of North America between the Mississippi River and Newfoundland and the adjoining regions of Central and South America and the Caribbean. Popple relied on numerous sources in creating his map, including Delisle, De Fer, Colonel John Barnwell, James Edward Oglethorpe, and Cadwallader Colden. Despite Popple's use of up-to-date sources, cartographical errors still remain. Lake Ontario is depicted in a southwest to northeast orientation, rather than its nearly east-west orientation. Lake Michigan is called by the old French name of Lake Illinois. A large lake filled with small islands appears in the area of present-day South Dakota. Popple's map was also criticized for relying too heavily on French sources and therefore showing land claims that were unfavorable to the British.

Despite the geographical inaccuracies, Popple's map was filled with splendid artistic elements. In upper left and right hand corners are insets of Niagara Falls, Mexico City, Quebec and New York City. At right is a column of 18 plans of ports, harbors and islands including Cartagena, Charleston, Bermuda, New York, and Boston. The map is richly embellished with a title cartouche featuring Native Americans, monkeys, a crocodile and a scene of European traders. Numerous ships and sea battles are shown throughout the oceans that are hachured to depict current directions. Engraved by Johannes Condet.(A+ ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pageOne of the Most Informative 18th Century Maps of the French Possessions in North America

Lot 128.  (Carte de la Nouvelle France, ou se voit le Cours des Grandes Rivieres de S. Laurens & de Mississipi Aujour d'hui S. Louis, aux Environs des-quelles se Trouvent les Etats, Pais, Nations, Peuples &c...), Chatelain, ca. 1719 . Derived from Nicholas de Fer's important four-sheet map of 1718, this is the most informative map of the French possessions in North America in the early 18th century. Louisiana and the Mississippi Valley are based on Delisle's manuscript map of 1701, while the geography of New England and eastern Canada originates with Franquelin. Inset at top left is a large-scale map of the Mississippi Delta and Mobile Bay, based on the voyage of Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville. Another inset plan and view of Quebec is enclosed in a very decorative cartouche at bottom right. The map is filled with wildlife, scenes of Indians hunting, Indian villages and notations, and the oceans are embellished with numerous ships, canoes and sea monsters. It was issued to promote the recently established Compagnie Francoise Occident, which was formed to fund the debt of Louis XIV and offered inducements to encourage settlement in Louisiana.

See also lot 827 for Kershaw's 4-volume reference work on the mapping of Canada, which references this map.(A ). Estimate: $3,000.00 - $3,750.00

goto detail pageStriking Map of Colonial America with Buffalo Vignette

Lot 129.  (Amplissimae Regionis Mississipi seu Provinciae Ludovicianae a R.P. Ludovico Hennepin Francisc Miss in America Septentrionali Anno 1687...), Homann, ca. 1720 . A striking map based on Delisle's landmark map of 1718, but covering a slightly larger area. It focuses on the Mississippi River Valley interior and Great Lakes, also detailing the Gulf Coast region, where the Mission de los Teyas is noted in present-day Texas. The map is splendidly adorned by vignettes of a buffalo and Native Americans in a cartouche filling the Atlantic, and a beaver colony at Niagara Falls under the title cartouche at upper left. Also depicted in the title cartouche is Father Louis Hennepin who explored the Great Lakes region and claimed to have reached the mouth of the Mississippi. The routes of Hennepin, de Soto and other explorers are traced in the map.(A ). Estimate: $2,200.00 - $2,500.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $300! Reduced Version of De Fer's Influential Map of French Possessions in North America

Lot 131.  (Carte de la Nouvelle France, ou se voit le Cours des Grandes Rivieres de S. Laurens & de Mississipi Aujour d'hui S. Louis, aux Environs des-quelles se Trouvent les Etats, Pais, Nations, Peuples &c...), De Fer/Ottens, ca. 1745 . Derived from Nicholas de Fer's important four-sheet map of 1718, this is the most informative map of the French possessions in North America in the early 18th century. It was issued to promote the recently established Compagnie Francoise Occident, which was formed to fund the debt of Louis XIV and offered inducements to encourage settlement in Louisiana. Louisiana and the Mississippi Valley are based on Delisle's manuscript map of 1701, while the geography of New England and eastern Canada originates with Franquelin. Inset at top left is a large-scale map of the Mississippi Delta and Mobile Bay, based on the voyage of Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville. This smaller version is found in atlases published by Ottens and other Dutch composite atlases. There is no engraver or publisher's imprint.

See also lot 827 for Kershaw's 4-volume reference work on the mapping of Canada, which references this map.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,300.00 - $2,750.00

goto detail pageD'Anville's Spectacular Map of Eastern Seaboard

Lot 132.  ([On 4 Sheets] Canada Louisiane et Terres Angloises), d'Anville, 1755 . This large-scale map covers the region from Labrador to the north of Florida, and from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean. It also extends to include the southern end of James Bay, and shows all of Great Lakes and the course of the St. Lawrence. The map provides early detail along the lower portion of the Missouri (alternately the "Pekitanoui") and the upper waters of the Mississippi. The Keweenaw peninsula is named as Kiaonan, and Isle Royale is called I. Minong. It is filled with scores of Indian tribes and villages named and located. The map was based in part on Mitchell's famous map of the United States which appeared earlier in the same year. D'Anville developed his version of the map with an emphasis on French influence on the area, omitting Mitchell's legend, references to English factories in the disputed trans-Allegheny area, and drew on French sources for additional details over the Mitchell map. The most obvious change, however, is the large inset of the St. Lawrence River basin ("Le Fleure Saint-Laurent") which appears on a separate sheet. D'Anville's usual, superb cartographic detail is seen throughout. A handsome cartouche designed by Gravelot fills the upper left of the map. On four sheets, with the top two sheets joined together.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $2,000.00

goto detail pageRare Map of the British Colonies Just After the French & Indian War

Lot 137.  (A New and Accurate Map of the British Dominions in America, According to the Treaty of 1763; Divided into the Several Provinces and Jurisdictions...), Kitchin, ca. 1769 . This rare historical map illustrates the British colonies after the Treaty of Paris and at the conclusion of the French and Indian War in America. The treaty ended French colonial ambitions in North America with minor exceptions. As a result, Spain ceded East and West Florida to Great Britain, France relinquished the title to the Louisiana Territory to Spain, and the Mississippi River was established as the British-Spanish Boundary. The map reflects the claims of the southern colonies that their charters extended to the Mississippi River, including Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Also of interest are the names and locations of many Indian tribes and nations located away from the more populated areas of English settlements. The map extends west well past the Mississippi River to include portions of Texas, labeled Part of New Mexico and Country of the Cenis. The Mississippi River ends abruptly in the area of present-day Minnesota, with the notation Parts Undiscover'd to the north, and a note further south along the Mississippi states that "thus far the Mississipi has been ascended." Additional notations appear just north of the Missouri River - "Extensive Meadows full of Buffaloes" - and just south of the river - "Country full of Mines." The mythical islands of I. Philippeaux and I. Pontchartrain still appear in Lake Superior. This map appeared in several publications, including The Maps and Charts to the Modern Part of the Universal History and John Knox's Historical Journal of the Campaigns of North America, and was also separately issued.(B ). Estimate: $1,400.00 - $1,700.00

goto detail pageScarce Large-Scale Chart of the Coast of New England

Lot 145.  (Carte Reduite des Costes Orientales de l'Amerique Septentrionale 1re. Feuille Contenant l'Isle Royale, l'Accadie, la Bay Francoise, la Nouvelle Angleterre et la Nouvelle Yorc...), Bellin, 1757 . Scarce early issue of this superb large chart of the coast of New England from just below Long Island through Nova Scotia and including Prince Edward Island (here called St. Jean). The coastline is extremely detailed and there is also good detail in the interior, particularly of the rivers. The most significant feature is the large inset of Boston harbor, Plan du Havre de Baston. The chart is very decorative with a large title cartouche, decorative border surrounding the inset, a large compass rose, and rhumb lines. The engraved seal of the Depot de la Marine appears at bottom left, and the price of trente sols appears below the neatline. This is the first state prior to the addition of rhumb lines in the inset map.(B ). Estimate: $1,700.00 - $2,000.00

goto detail pageMap Depicting the Proposed State of Franklin

Lot 167.  (Charte der XV Vereinigten Staaten von Nord-America nach Murdochischer Projection...), Gussefeld, 1804 . One of the most interesting and scarce features on early maps of the United States is the appearance of the proposed State of Franklin. In 1784 settlers in the frontier west of the Appalachian Mountains organized a state government with the state to be named in honor of Benjamin Franklin. Congress turned down their appeal but the state maintained a legislature and governor until 1788. This ephemeral state appeared on a small number of maps into the early part of the 19th century. On this map, and other continental European maps, Franklin is misplaced in the region that is now West Virginia and eastern Kentucky, instead of eastern Tennessee. Elsewhere on this interesting map, the region north of the Ohio River is labeled Indiana and includes locations of Indian villages and a few early settlements and forts. Maine extends well into New Brunswick. This is the second state of this map, first published in 1800. See our June 2015 newsletter article on the State of Franklin here.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,200.00 - $1,500.00

goto detail pageJansson's Influential Map of the East Coast

Lot 174.  (Nova Anglia Novum Belgium et Virginia), Jansson, ca. 1639 . This is the first state of Jansson's important map of the eastern coast of North America covering from just south of the outer banks in present-day North Carolina to Nova Scotia. The map is based on the less well-known map of Johannes de Laet of 1630, but covers a slightly larger area. Because of its wider distribution, Jansson's map was much more influential, particularly with its depiction of the Dutch of Nieuw Nederland (New York). Cape Cod, Lake Champlain, Long Island, and the Chesapeake Bay are easily recognized compared to earlier maps. In fact, this map contains some of the earliest accurate cartography of the region showing New Amsterdam, Manhattan Island (Manbattes), Fort Orange, the Hudson (Noordt River) and the Delaware (Zuydt River). The map includes part of the Great Lakes, labeled Grand Lac and Lac des Yroquois, an unnamed Lake Champlain, and a fictitious lake at the headwaters of the Delaware River. According to Karpinski, this "is the first printed complete map of Lake Superior" although according to Burden there is no evidence to support that and Grand Lac is more likely Lake Huron. The map is adorned with two decorative cartouches, ships, sea monsters and compass roses. French text on verso, published between 1639-44.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $1,900.00

goto detail pageImportant Map of Colonial New England and the Mid-Atlantic

Lot 175.  (Nova Belgica et Anglia Nova), Blaeu, ca. 1642 . This important map, first issued in 1635, is one of the first to focus on the Dutch colony in North America and to name Nieu Amsterdam (New York). It is based on the manuscript of Andriaen Block (1614), a Dutch fur trader, who explored the area between Cape Cod and Manhattan and was the first to correctly delineate the longitudinal scale of the coastline and establish Manhattan as an island. The colony of Nieu Pleimonth is identified, as well as other English names along the coast, which were derived from Smith's map of New England in 1616. The map is oriented with north to the right and is richly adorned with a variety of wildlife, including the first appearance of beavers, polecats and otters on a printed map. Quebec is noted with a minute depiction of the fort and buildings, and the mythical kingdom pf Norumbega is noted near the R. Pentagouet (Penobscot River) in present-day Maine. A large Mohawk village is shown derived from the White-de Bry engravings. It is further embellished with a large title cartouche flanked by two natives, sailing ships, canoes, and compass roses. Dutch text on verso, published between 1642-64.(A ). Estimate: $3,000.00 - $4,000.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $100! Full Original Color

Lot 183.  (Nova Virginiae Tabula), Hondius/Blaeu, [1663 ]. This map was derived from Capt. John Smith's map of 1612, which was the first to depict the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries with any accuracy. The early settlement of Jamestown is noted as Iamestowne, and there are a number of other place names, both English and Native American. In the upper left corner is an engraving of the great Indian chief, Powhatan, seated on his throne and surrounded by his subjects. A Susquehanna chief is depicted on the right under the British coat-of-arms and a key cartouche. The plate was engraved by Dirck Grijp and was originally published by Jodocus Hondius Jr. in 1618. It was purchased by Willem Blaeu shortly after Hondius' death (1629) and Blaeu's imprint replaced that of Hondius. French text on verso.(A ). Estimate: $2,400.00 - $3,000.00

goto detail pageOne of the Most Beautiful Charts of Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay

Lot 185.  (Carte Particuliere de Virginie, Maryland, Pennsilvanie, la Nouvelle Iarsey. Orient et Occidentale), Jaillot/Mortier, ca. 1700 . This large, important nautical chart covers the mid-Atlantic coastline from Staten Island in New York south to Currituck Inlet in North Carolina with the Chesapeake Bay featured prominently. Two compass roses orient north to the right. The chart is a close copy of John Thornton & William Fisher's chart of the same region that appeared in the English Pilot in 1689. Cartographically, it is largely based on the extremely important and rare Augustine Herrman map. The map provides exceptional detail of the waterways including soundings, navigational hazards, and coastal communities. Philadelphia is prominently shown. The chart was prepared by Alexis-Hubert Jaillot, and appeared in the atlas Suite du Neptune Francois in 1700 and Atlas Nouveau in 1708, published by Pierre Mortier whose imprint is in the distance scale at lower left.(A ). Estimate: $6,000.00 - $7,500.00

goto detail pageFirst State of Robert de Vaugondy's Essential Map of Virginia and Maryland

Lot 188.  (Carte de la Virginie et du Maryland Dressee sur la Grande Carte Angloise de Mrs. Josue Fry et Pierre Jefferson), Robert de Vaugondy, 1755 . This handsome map is the French edition of the Fry-Jefferson map - one of the most important 18th century maps of the region. Due to the rarity and high value of the four-sheet English version of the Fry-Jefferson map, the first state of the single-sheet French version is the earliest obtainable map to accurately depict the interior of Virginia beyond the Tidewater, and is an essential map for the Virginia map collection. This is the most desirable first state with the Limites du Lord Fairfax delineating the Fairfax Grant in Virginia’s Northern Neck and the vast region northwest of it. The signature of the engraver, Elisabeth Haussard, is below the cartouche.

The map details the coastline from Cape May in New Jersey to the Currituck Inlet and inland with finely engraved details of the interior regions of Virginia, the ridges, rivers and valleys of the Appalachians, and the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. The locations of native villages and wagon roads are noted as well. Delaware is labeled as De La War Counties. While the title is in French, most of the information is in English.

Surveyor Peter Jefferson was Thomas Jefferson's father, and Joshua Fry was a commander in the colonial militia during the French and Indian War. They were ideal appointees for the project as they had accumulated a substantial amount of information from their work on the western frontier. Their knowledge, along with reports received from other explorers, produced the most detailed account of the inhabited parts of the colonies.(A ). Estimate: $2,400.00 - $3,000.00

goto detail pageImportant Revolutionary War Map

Lot 191.  (A Map of the Provinces of New-York and New-Jersey, with a part of Pennsylvania and the Province of Quebec, from the Topographical Observations of C. J. Sauthier), Lotter, 1777 . A beautiful Revolutionary War period map of New York and New Jersey with portions of Pennsylvania and Quebec. The map details areas crucial to the war's early years, particularly the Hudson Valley and Lake Champlain. It covers from the eastern edge of Lake Ontario up the St. Lawrence to the Connecticut River in the north, and from Chesapeake Bay along the New Jersey shore to Long Island across to Martha's Vineyard in the southern portion of the map. The western part of New York is labeled Country of the Six Nations referring to the Indian nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. One of the nicer features of this large map is the meticulously rendered river systems and towns, particularly the Hudson and Connecticut Rivers. Large counties fill the northern part of New York and a line bisects New Jersey into eastern and western provinces. The prime meridian is shown through New York. There is a small inset map of Chesapeake Bay at lower left. This map is a smaller version, re-engraved by Lotter, of Claude Joseph Sauthier's map of 1776 that was published in London by Faden. This issue by Lotter was directed at a German audience, probably because of the high number of German mercenaries fighting with the British army and the increasing international interest by Europeans in North American affairs. Printed on two sheets, joined.

Claude Joseph Sauthier, a French draughtsman and surveyor, drew on his own detailed surveys for this map, as well as on the surveys of Bernard Ratzer another important surveyor and mapmaker in the years preceding the Revolution. Sauthier accompanied William Tryon to North Carolina in 1767 and then to New York in 1771. Appointed surveyor for the Province of New York in 1773 he was involved in determining the disputed boundaries of the province. After 1776 he was employed as a military surveyor. His map gave British commanders an excellent overview of areas that would be crucial in the early years of the war.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,900.00 - $2,200.00

goto detail pageOne of the Earliest Published Maps of the English Colony of Georgia

Lot 201.  (New Map of Georgia), Bernard, 1737 . This is a scarce map that is one of the earliest published maps of the English colony of Georgia. It is a somewhat larger example that was apparently taken from the 1733 map in Martyn's Reasons for Establishing The Colony of Georgia, although with numerous errors and omissions. This map has also been attributed to James Oglethorpe, founder of the British Georgia colony in 1732, and presents extensive English claims southward to just north of St. Augustine, no doubt inflaming Spanish interests at the time. This hostility led to the War of Jenkins Ear in 1739. The map covers the region from Florida and up the east coast extending north to above the Cartuck River at the northern border of South Carolina. It extends west to beyond the Mississippi River, showing all of colonial South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The southern portion of Florida is composed of numerous islands. A southerly bloated coast along the Florida panhandle suggests vast lands that could be utilized by farmers under the “Oglethorpe Plan” for colonization. Coincidentally, the lands end at the line demarcing “The South Bounds of Carolina”. Few settlements are identified, with the exception of Charles Town, Port Royall, St. Augustine and a few others, and the prime meridian is drawn at Charleston. This map also includes notations related to the number of men in various Indian tribes: Illinois 500 men, Weachthenoes 500 men, Okesee Nation 700 men. A fascinating map that was clearly constructed to promote the Georgia colonization efforts.

Few examples of this map are seen in sales records for the past three decades.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,400.00 - $1,700.00

goto detail pageDe Laet's Important Map of the South

Lot 211.  (Florida, et Regiones Vicinae), Gerritsz & de Laet, ca. 1630 . This is one of three maps of North America that was included in De Laet's important work on the Americas. It greatly influenced the subsequent work of Blaeu, Jansson and Sanson. It was most likely engraved by Hessel Gerritsz, who drew on the cartography of Jacques le Moyne, as interpreted by Claesz. The Florida Peninsula is here named Tegesta provinc, the name of an Indian tribe that lived on the southwest coast, while the larger region is called Florida. Much of the other nomenclature was drawn from the Chaves/Ortelius map of 1584 with the notable additional place names of St. Augustine and Tampa Bay. Near the western border is the Bahia del Spiritu Santo which is fed by several large rivers.(B+ ). Estimate: $3,000.00 - $3,750.00

goto detail pageImportant Map of Colonial Louisiana and the Mississippi River

Lot 228.  (A Map of Louisiana and of the River Mississipi), Senex, ca. 1721 . This fascinating map focuses on the French possession of Louisiana, which takes up the region between New Mexico and the Appalachian Mountains. The map is closely derived from Delisle's landmark map of 1718; notably discarding Delisle's notation regarding French claims to Carolina. The map is filled with information on mining and the Indians, including villages, hunting grounds, promiscuous nations and nations destroyed. Early roads and explorers' tracks are meticulously delineated with extensive notations. The map warns of Wandering Indians & Man-eaters along the Texas coast. New Orleans, despite having been founded in 1718, does not appear on the map. The allegorical title cartouche celebrates the wealth of the region with a mighty river god, Fame blowing her trumpet atop the cartouche and putti holding richly laden cornucopias and mining.

John Senex was one of the leading English cartographers of the 18th century. He published this map in response to English interest in Louisiana and the Mississippi River valley where Carolina traders were determined to compete with the French. It is interesting to note that Senex dedicated his map to William Law, the father of financier John Law, whose scheme to develop French Louisiana resulted in one the most famous periods of financial turmoil in history - the infamous Mississippi Scheme or Mississippi Bubble.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pageGorgeous Early Map of Florida Territory

Lot 280.  (Map of Florida), Tanner, 1823 . This large, attractive map was published in Tanner's first edition American Atlas, which is considered one of the finest American atlases ever published. It was issued around the time that the Florida Territory was officially established as a possession of the United States. Most of the settlements, including St. Augustine, are located in the northern part of the territory, while the southern portion of the peninsula, under Seminole control, is bereft of European presence. It depicts only four counties: Escambia, Jackson, Duval, and a massive St. Johns. The map identifies "Cape Florida Settlement" near present-day Miami and locates several old Spanish land grants including Arredondo and Miranda. It is filled with descriptive notes including "Extensive Inundated Region covered with Pine and Hummock Islands of all sizes and generally called The Ever Glades."

Henry Schenck Tanner was one of the most productive and successful cartographic publishers of the early nineteenth century, a period known as the golden age of American cartography. The large, beautifully engraved maps from this atlas were considered among the "most splendid works of the kind ever executed in this country," as reported in the United States Gazette (Philadelphia) in 1823.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map. (B+ ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,300.00

goto detail pageImpressive Blueback Chart of the Florida Keys and Dry Tortugas

Lot 285.  (The Bahama Banks and Gulf of Florida), Blunt, 1847 . This impressive, two-sheet "blueback" chart covers much of Florida including the Keys and Dry Tortugas, the northern coast of Cuba, and part of the Bahamas. It was first issued in Blunt's 1827 maritime atlas and has been updated and significantly improved based upon the survey work of Colonel Abert (Topographical Engineers) and Commander Powel (Navy). The nautical information includes scores of soundings, hazards, currents, sea floor types, lighthouses, notes and exceptional coastal detail. Features an inset Chart of Key West by George Gauld, 12 coastal approach views, and 5 compass roses to aid in navigation. Backed with stiff blue paper.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map.(B ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $2,000.00

goto detail pageThe First Printed Map of Hawaii

Lot 299.  (Chart of the Sandwich Islands), Cook, [1785 ]. Although the first printed map of Hawaii is credited to Captain James Cook, it was prepared for publication by Lieutenant Henry Roberts, who prepared all of the maps for the three-volume narrative of Cook's final voyage. Roberts drew the map from a now-missing survey by William Bligh (of Mutiny on the Bounty fame) who was Sailing Master on the HMS Resolution. The map is a landmark in Hawaiian cartography and provided the basis for all subsequent mapping of the islands. The routes of the Resolution and the Discovery around the islands are carefully traced with nice topographical detail on each island. A large inset of Karakakooa Bay (Kealakekua Bay) is featured with details of soundings, navigational hazards and the anchorages of the two ships, and quaint depictions of houses, palm trees, and fields inland. Cook spent his last few weeks in Kealakekua Bay before dying in a confrontation with natives on February 14, 1779. Engraved by William Harrison and published by Nicol and Cadell.(B+ ). Estimate: $800.00 - $950.00

goto detail pageImportant Revolutionary War Map of the Battle of White Plains

Lot 330.  (A Plan of the Operations of the King's Army Under the Command of General Sr. William Howe, K.B. in New York and East New Jersey...), Sauthier/Faden, 1777 . This important Revolutionary War map depicts the battle of White Plains, which was waged on October 28, 1776, as well as the events leading up to the battle and the aftermath. It illustrates the region surrounding the Hudson River from New York City and the East River to the Croton River. This map, derived from a manuscript map by Claude Joseph Sauthier, is filled with incredible detail of the positions and movements of the British and Continental armies from October 12 to November 28. Incredibly, this map was published in London by William Faden just 3 months after the events took place.

After being forced to retreat from Manhattan by General William Howe, General George Washington moved his troops north, eventually making their way to White Plains in late October. Anticipating the Continential Army's retreat, Howe sent regiments by ship to Pells Point and Myers Point, marching them northward to White Plains. Washington failed to establish firm control over the high ground, and Howe successfully gained control of White Plains, forcing Washington's army to retreat further north near North Castle. Rather than following, Howe redirected his efforts to eliminate Continental forces from Manhattan, which he also completed successfully in the Battle of Fort Washington on November 16.

Published by Faden on February 25, 1777. This is the second state with three British ships (Tartar, Phoenix, and Roebuck) near the entrance of Croton River, with a dotted line showing their course up the Hudson River.(A ). Estimate: $10,000.00 - $12,000.00

goto detail pageRare French & Indian War Plan of Fort Edward

Lot 336.  (A Plan of the Royal Block House, with the Environs at Fort Edward), Rocque, [1765 ]. This simple plan is centered on the Hudson River, oriented to the east, with Fort Edward appearing at top adjacent to the title. Fort Edward was constructed in 1755 during the French and Indian War by General Phineas Lyman, a colonial American who served in the British Army during the war. The plan shows various waterways, a barracks on Rogers Island, a road to Lake George, and a blockhouse on the west bank of the Hudson. A small inset shows a bird's-eye plan of the blockhouse.

John Rocque was born Jean, the son of French Huguenot emigrant parents, who settled in London when he was quite young. Rocque is known for his survey and mapping of London, particularly the 16-sheet city plan he published in 1746, considered to be the finest depiction of London at that time. In 1751 he was appointed Chorographer to the Prince of Wales. His business was destroyed by fire in 1750, but he continued afterward and maintained the success of his business. His wife, Mary Ann Rocque, took over the business upon his death in 1762, finalizing publication of A Set of Plans and Forts in America. The work was first published in 1763, with a second edition appearing in 1765, with the only change being the addition of plate numbers. A Set of Plans and Forts in America included 30 maps and plans of important forts and other locations important during the French and Indian War, which had just concluded. Peter Andrews, also known as Pierre Andre, worked with Mary Ann Rocque and engraved some (if not all) of the plans in the work; his imprint appears on four of the plans.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map.(A ). Estimate: $900.00 - $1,100.00

goto detail pageRare French & Indian War Plan of Fort Stanwix

Lot 337.  (Plan of Fort Stanwix, Built at Oneida Station, by Provincial Troops, in 1758), Rocque, [1765 ]. This bird's-eye plan depicts the star-shaped Fort Stanwix, at the location of present-day Rome, NY. The fort was constructed under the direction of British General John Stanwix in 1758 during the French and Indian War. The fort was strategically located to guard the Oneida Station, an important portage connecting the Atlantic seaboard to the interior of the continent through the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers to Wood Creek and ultimately Lake Ontario. The plan shows buildings in the fort, roads, the magazine, and the Mohawk River. A small compass rose orients north to the left, and a lettered key identifies locations on the plan.

John Rocque was born Jean, the son of French Huguenot emigrant parents, who settled in London when he was quite young. Rocque is known for his survey and mapping of London, particularly the 16-sheet city plan he published in 1746, considered to be the finest depiction of London at that time. In 1751 he was appointed Chorographer to the Prince of Wales. His business was destroyed by fire in 1750, but he continued afterward and maintained the success of his business. His wife, Mary Ann Rocque, took over the business upon his death in 1762, finalizing publication of A Set of Plans and Forts in America. The work was first published in 1763, with a second edition appearing in 1765, with the only change being the addition of plate numbers. A Set of Plans and Forts in America included 30 maps and plans of important forts and other locations important during the French and Indian War, which had just concluded. Peter Andrews, also known as Pierre Andre, worked with Mary Ann Rocque and engraved some (if not all) of the plans in the work; his imprint appears on four of the plans.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map.(B+ ). Estimate: $800.00 - $950.00

goto detail pageRare French & Indian War Plan of Fort George

Lot 338.  (Plan of Part of Fort George, with the Barracks &c. Erected in the Year 1759...), Rocque, [1765 ]. This bird's-eye plan depicts Fort George, one of 5 forts of the same name that existed in the province of New York in the 18th century. This fort was constructed under the direction of British General Jeffery Amherst in 1759 at the southern end of Lake George near Fort William Henry, which had been destroyed by the French in 1757 and abandoned. Fort George was used as a base of operations against the French Fort Carillon on Lake Champlain during the French and Indian War. This plan shows the partially built fort, the barracks, the magazine, a stockade fort that was used while the fort was still under construction, and the road to Fort Edward.

John Rocque was born Jean, the son of French Huguenot emigrant parents, who settled in London when he was quite young. Rocque is known for his survey and mapping of London, particularly the 16-sheet city plan he published in 1746, considered to be the finest depiction of London at that time. In 1751 he was appointed Chorographer to the Prince of Wales. His business was destroyed by fire in 1750, but he continued afterward and maintained the success of his business. His wife, Mary Ann Rocque, took over the business upon his death in 1762, finalizing publication of A Set of Plans and Forts in America. The work was first published in 1763, with a second edition appearing in 1765, with the only change being the addition of plate numbers. A Set of Plans and Forts in America included 30 maps and plans of important forts and other locations important during the French and Indian War, which had just concluded. Peter Andrews, also known as Pierre Andre, worked with Mary Ann Rocque and engraved some (if not all) of the plans in the work; his imprint appears on four of the plans.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map.(B+ ). Estimate: $900.00 - $1,100.00

goto detail pageRare Map of the Oil Region in Pennsylvania

Lot 353.  (The Pennsylvania Oil Region Showing Each Farm up to the Present Time as Well as All Developements), Duval & Son, 1869 . Detailed cadastral survey of Warren, Crawford, Venango and Forrest Counties, the oil region of Pennsylvania in 1869 when the map was published by Henry E. Wrigley, civil engineer and surveyor. The map is constructed on such a large scale (2 inches = 1 mile) that it was capable of "showing each farm up to the present time." Wrigley became head of the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and published reports on the oil industry. Dissected and mounted on linen, as issued. Folds into new paper self-wrapper with original title label.

A very rare issue with only a few examples known to be held in institutions, including the Library of Congress and the British Library.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $1,900.00

goto detail pageImportant Early Texas History with Rare Map of Republic of Texas

Lot 359.  (Map of Texas Containing The Latest Grants & Discoveries [bound in] The History of Texas; or, the Emigrant's, Farmer's, and Politician's Guide to the Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of That Country...), Lee, [1836 ]. This is one of the earliest maps to show the Republic of Texas, which had gained independence on March 2, 1836. The map shows Texas bordered by the Red River in the north, the Nueces River in the south, and the Anahuaca Mountains in the west. The land is divided into numerous grants, including those for Cameron, Woodbury & Co., Austin & Williams, Whellin, Burnet, Powers and Felisola. Austin's Colony, the first legal settlement in Texas, and Green DeWitt's Colony are also noted. Gonzalez, the hub of DeWitt's Colony, was the site of the first battle of the Texas Revolution. The map is filled with towns, Indian villages, early roads, and rivers. A number of silver, iron and copper mines are also noted. At bottom left is a note from David B. Edwards indicating the possibility of identifying the Rio Bravo as the boundary for Texas: "If this river should ever become the western boundary of Texas (as desired by its inhabitants,) it will add 100 miles to its sea coast and 50,000 square miles to its superficies." The map (measuring 8.5 x 12.4") was created by E. F. Lee and published by J.A. James & Co.

This map is the frontispiece of David Barnett Edward's The History of Texas; or, the Emigrant's, Farmer's, and Politician's Guide to the Character, Climate, Soil and Productions of That Country... Edwards was born in Scotland, and immigrated to the United States in 1819. While teaching at an academy in Alexandria, Louisiana, Edwards toured Texas and subsequently moved his family to Gonzalez, Texas. There he served as a principal of the Gonzalez Seminary, a local academy. Edwards wrote his book while living in Texas and included significant information about the geography, agriculture, history, people, political events, and climate of the state. Streeter describes the book thus: "This contemporary history by Edward, notwithstanding some idiosyncrasies of the author, is one of the essential Texas books." The "idiosyncrasies" mentioned by Streeter relate to Edward's definitive pro-Mexican rhetoric, which managed to offend nearly everyone in Texas. In his work he insulted President Andrew Jackson, asserted that there were no riches to be made in Texas, condemned Texas Methodists, and maintained that American settlers should be expelled from the "Mexican" Republic. His work brought such heated criticism that Edwards was forced to move his family out of Texas. This rare and early Texas history is essential to any Texas collection.

336 pp., plus leaf of advertising and folding map. Original maroon patterned cloth with engraved paper label and manuscript shelf label.(A ). Estimate: $5,500.00 - $7,000.00

goto detail pageDecorative Mexican-American War Map Featuring the New State of Texas

Lot 382.  (Ornamental Map of the United States & Mexico), Phelps, 1847 . This great map of the two countries features the new, enlarged state of Texas. Bright colors delineate political boundaries and boldly mark the route of the "Great Oregon Rail Road" from New York to Oregon City. Portraits of Cortez, Washington, and Montezuma appear above the map; below are the great seals of the United States and Mexico, portraits of generals Taylor and Santa Anna, and a view of an Aztec temple. Text describes the history of the region culminating with the Mexican American War which had not yet ended at the time of publication.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,300.00

goto detail pageEarly Map of the American Southwest and Mexico

Lot 383.  (Hispania Nova), Wytfliet, ca. 1597 . This is one of the earliest maps of the American Southwest and Mexico, including the southern part of present-day Texas, here called Floridae Pars, with the Rio Grande, labeled R. de Palmas. The map concentrates on the Spanish area of influence and is one of nineteen regional maps of the Americas contained in Wytfliet's atlas, which was the first devoted exclusively to the New World. Stipple engraved seas, calligraphy and a decorative title cartouche adorn the map.(A ). Estimate: $950.00 - $1,200.00

goto detail pageA Foundation Map for the American Southwest

Lot 384.  (Nueva Hispania Tabula Nova), Ruscelli, [1598 ]. This is a foundation map in the cartography of the American Southwest, and a must for collectors of that region. It is an enlarged version of Gastaldi's map of 1548 with the only notable change being the peninsular Yucatan. The legendary seven cities of Ciuola are prominently depicted and Mexico City is shown floating in a large lake. The place names along the upper Gulf Coast reveal the explorations of Pineda, Cabeza de Vaca and Moscosso. The Mississippi makes its appearance as the Rio de Spiritu Santo and the R. Tontonteanc flows in the vicinity of the Colorado River. Considered the earliest relatively obtainable map of Mexico and the American Southwest. This is the third state according to Burden with the additions of Calmifor for California, Siera Nevad for the Sierra Nevadas and the addition of Mare Pacificum as well as a ship in the Pacific. Italian text on verso.(A ). Estimate: $1,200.00 - $1,500.00

goto detail pageHumboldt's Landmark Map of the Southwest

Lot 389.  (Carte Generale du Royaume de la Nouvelle Espagne...), von Humboldt, [1811 ]. This is the first French edition of Humboldt's landmark map of the Southwest. It was the most important and accurate map of the region to be published at the time, and would remain the standard source until Fremont's mapping of the area in the 1840s. As a testament to the accuracy of the map, contemporaries Zebulon Pike and Aaron Arrowsmith copied copious information in Humboldt's map for their own publications in 1810, one year prior to Humboldt's printed map was released to the public.

Humboldt, a world-renowned naturalist and explorer, spent 5 years (1799-1804) traveling in South and Central America collecting data on plant and animal life. In 1803, he arrived in Mexico City to compile his findings into Essai Politique Sur le Royaume de la Nouvelle-Espagne..., and it is during this time that he constructed this map. Humboldt's reputation provided him access to a vast number of documents and maps held in the local Spanish archives, including important accounts from Costanso, Mascaro, Alzate, de Fer, Urrutia, Pichardo, Lopez, Carces, Font, Venegas, Lafora, and Miera. In fact, the northern third of the map is based almost entirely from Miera's Escalante earlier map (1777). Cartographically, the map covers the entire American Southwest and Mexico from Natchitoches west to Baja California and from Utah south to Tehuantepec. In addition to the map's superior accuracy, it is notable for introducing the concept of hachuring (orthographic projection) to convey topography. However, despite these improvements and innovations, Humboldt's map still contains a few errors including a depiction of the mythical Lake Timpanogos, along with several notes concerning its sources. Humboldt himself acknowledges the incomplete information and that "it must be allowed that all that part of the west of North America is still but very imperfectly known." Printed on two sheets and joined.

A seminal map of the American Southwest which Streeter describes as "one of the six most desirable maps of Texas."(A ). Estimate: $10,000.00 - $13,000.00

goto detail pageRare First Edition

Lot 409.  (A Draft of the Golden & Adjacent Islands, with Part of ye Isthmus of Darien... [on sheet with] A New Map of ye Isthmus of Darien in America, the Bay of Panama, the Gulph of Vallona or St. Michael...), Hacke, [1699 ]. Two maps on one sheet. The upper map shows the north coast of Panama with part of the San Blas Islands and features the short-lived colony of New Edinburgh. The Company of Scotland established this ill-fated trading settlement on the Darien coast of Panama in 1698. The colony was well located with a good harbor but within a year the colony failed amid devastating illness and attack by Spanish galleons. The failure of the Darien Scheme (as it became known) contributed greatly to the crippling of the entire Scottish economy that eventually led to the dissolution of the Scottish Parliament and the 1707 Act of Union with England. The lower map, attributed to Hacke and Robert Morden, shows the whole isthmus of Panama with part of Costa Rica and Colombia. Both maps were finely engraved by Herman Moll with rhumb lines, compass roses, sailing ships, soundings and decorative cartouches. This is the rare first edition.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,300.00

goto detail pageRare Map of the Bay of Honduras

Lot 414.  (A Chart of the Bay of Honduras), Speer, 1771 . A finely detailed map of the Bay of Honduras including present-day Belize and much of Guatemala and Honduras. This area was hotly contested between England and Spain throughout the colonial period. The British logwood cutters were a constant thorn in the side of the Spanish and the cluster of camps at the mouth of the Belize River (Belize City today) was one of the most ransacked settlements in the new world. The map provides an excellent view of the tortuous Atlantic coastline and shows numerous channels, anchorages, soundings, keys, reefs, shoals and islands including the popular, present-day tourist destinations of Ambergris Caye and Roatan Island. Engraved by Bayly.

Captain Joseph Smith Speer was an officer in the Royal Navy who spent many years in the West Indies. His most famous work, the West-India Pilot, contained 13 maps of the region, published in 1766, followed by an extended 26-map edition in 1771.

This map is extremely rare. We have not found any examples listed for sale in the last 35 years.

See also lot 804 for Phillips' A List of Geographical Atlases in the Library of Congress, which references this map.(B+ ). Estimate: $450.00 - $650.00

goto detail pageWall Map of Cuba Prepared for Spanish-American War

Lot 436.  (Military Map of the Island of Cuba Prepared in the Military Information Division Adjutant General's Office, War Department from the Latest Official Sources), U.S. War Department, 1897 . This massive four-sheet map measures 8 feet in length and contains incredible detail of the island of Cuba. The map was created in preparation for the Spanish-American War, a 10 week-long conflict that was primarily fought over Cuban independence. The Americans won the short battle which gave them temporary control of Cuba and possession of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines, thus eliminating Spain's final possessions in the Americas and Asia. The map shows Cuba divided into the 6 provinces established by the Spanish colonial government in 1879. There is excellent detail of towns, telegraph stations, military trenches, railroads, highways, wagon roads, and even foot paths. Below the title is a legend and a list of abbreviations used on the map. Each sheet bears a compass rose pointing north-northwest. The first, second and fourth sheets were drawn by C. H. Ourand, while the third sheet was drawn by W. Morey, Jr. Photolithography by Julius Bien & Co. Printed on 4 separate sheets and joined.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,300.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $300! Rare Carte-a-Figures Map of Europe

Lot 486.  (Nova Europae Descriptio ), de Wit, ca. 1660 . A stunning carte-a-figures map of Europe extending to include Iceland and a bit of Greenland. It is flanked at sides with portraits of eight European monarchs. Six vignette views at top show the cities of Rome, Amsterdam, Paris, London, Seville and Prague. The map is very finely engraved and further embellished with a title cartouche surmounted by the personification of Europa.(A ). Estimate: $2,400.00 - $3,000.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $200! Rare State of Jansson's Carte-a-Figures Map of Europe

Lot 487.  (Nova Europae Descriptio), Jansson, ca. 1660 . This magnificent carte-a-figures map of Europe extends to include Iceland, the imaginary island of Frisland, and a bit of Greenland. It is flanked at sides with pairs of costumed figures from ten European countries. At top are six vignette views of the cities of Lisbon, Toledo, London, Paris, Rome, and Venice. The map is very finely engraved and further embellished with a title cartouche surmounted by putti, ships sailing the seas, and lions in northern Africa. This map was originally published by Jodocus Hondius the Younger with a lower border depicting additional town views. The bottom border was removed by Jansson to fit in smaller atlases, and was only published in three editions between 1638-58. Jansson then re-engraved the title cartouche along with other embellishments, as seen in this example, however by this time the map had been replaced with a more modern map of Europe omitting the carte-a-figures borders. This third state was not included in any of Jansson's atlases and was likely separately published, thus making surviving examples very rare.(A ). Estimate: $2,400.00 - $3,000.00

goto detail pageRare Satirical Map of Europe at Start of World War I

Lot 490.  (Humoristische Karte von Europa im Jahre 1914), Leutert & Schneiderwind, 1914 . This rare political caricature map of Europe depicts the continent at the outbreak of World War I. The map was created by Karl Lehmann-Dumont in Dresden, and depicts the Germans' view of the alliance situation and territorial issues towards the end of the first year of the war. The key countries involved in the war are represented by human caricatures with various props that help illustrate the situation. German text below the map describes each country's "character." Published by Leutert & Schneidewind.

Each country is depicted in a fascinating and humorous manner. Germany is described as a Deutsche Michel (an ordinary or average German), stretching and extending himself with all his might, already grasping the Frenchman by his throat and punching the Russian bear. Germany's Imperial Eagle unleashes bees from their hive to attack its enemies, which appear on the map as both bees and missiles. France, already covered in bees, appears to retreat, and calls to England for help. Meanwhile, the French rooster crows about its victories in the battles from 1870-71 (Franco-Prussian War). The giant Russian bears an "Angel of Peace" symbol on his cap, with a bottle of Vodka in one hand and a whip of "revolution" in the other hand. The Russian opens his mouth wide in an attempt to swallow Germany and Austria whole, but is deterred by the German bees. England, who has caused Egypt to declare war, stands on bags of money while being punched in the face by an iron fist. The English bulldog finds it difficult to breathe with an Indian snake wrapped around its neck. The Englishman has also dragged Japan into the war, and holds a string that is attached to Japan, depicted in an inset at left. Numerous other intricate relationships and symbolic references fill the map.

Although the human personification of continents and countries can be seen as early as the 14th century (on maps by Opicinus de Canestris), human and animal metaphors on maps reached a new level in Europe between 1845 and 1945 with political cartoon maps. The rise of these satirical maps reflected the momentous political and cultural changes that occurred during the time. Political leaders were caricaturized and European nations were given symbolic identities that lent humor and accessibility to the geographical map. Based on popular stereotypes, these visual representations even found their way into the classroom to help bring geography and politics to life. Original serio-comic maps are very scarce due to their ephemeral nature.(A ). Estimate: $2,000.00 - $2,300.00

goto detail pageRare Satirical Map of Europe at Start of World War I

Lot 491.  (Carte Symbolique de l'Europe / Europe en 1914), Crete/Delandre, 1915 . This rare political caricature map of Europe depicts the continent at the beginning of World War I. The map depicts the alliance situation and territorial issues towards the end of the first year of the war. The key countries involved in the war are represented by human or animal caricatures with various national symbols that help illustrate the situation. The map itself is devoid of text, with a lettered key inserted at bottom right to identify the countries portrayed. This map was designed by French artist B. Crété and published by Delandre in Paris. A close variant was created by Validslav Levinsky, an artist in Warsaw, and published in Poland. It is believed that Crété's edition appeared first, in part due to the date (9bre 1914) in the imprint, and the fact that Levinsky's edition did not pass the censors until April 1915. Several editions were published in Paris and Poland through 1915, with a notable difference in the depiction of Italy. The earlier editions depict Italy as a peaceful mandolin player lulling Sicily to sleep (as seen in this example), while later editions, published after Italy joined the Allies in the war, show Italy as a soldier holding a gun. All editions are scarce.

Each country is depicted in a fascinating and stereotypical manner. France is shown as Marianne riding a cockerel, stabbing a dagger into the forehead of a menacing bull representing Germany. The bull is also being prodded from behind by the dominating figure of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Sweden and Norway are illustrated as two young embracing women looking over an atlas. Great Britain is depicted as a naval captain riding a large warship. Austria-Hungary is the only country that is not represented by a human or animal form, but rather is shown as a graveyard surrounding a large fallen crown, foreshadowing the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Numerous other intricate relationships and symbolic references fill the map.

Although the human personification of continents and countries can be seen as early as the 14th century (on maps by Opicinus de Canestris), human and animal metaphors on maps reached a new level in Europe between 1845 and 1945 with political cartoon maps. The rise of these satirical maps reflected the momentous political and cultural changes that occurred during the time. Political leaders were caricaturized and European nations were given symbolic identities that lent humor and accessibility to the geographical map. Based on popular stereotypes, these visual representations even found their way into the classroom to help bring geography and politics to life. Original serio-comic maps are very scarce due to their ephemeral nature.(B+ ). Estimate: $2,750.00 - $3,500.00

goto detail pagePtolemaic Map of the British Isles

Lot 492.  ([Title on Verso] Europae Tabula Prima Continet Insulam Albion, sive Britanniam & Hyberniam), Ptolemy/Fries, [1541 ]. This superb Ptolemaic map of the British Isles is presented in a trapezoidal projection with climates and ancient parallels inserted in the side borders. The geographical data used by Ptolemy was collected in the second century A.D., when Britain lay at the extremity of the known world. Thus the representation is distorted with Scotland shown in a distinctive east-west orientation and Ireland located too far north. The principal cities, tribal regions and rivers are located. This map is from the same woodblock used for the 1535 edition with revised Latin text on verso. It was printed by Gaspar Treschsel in Vienne, and is sometimes called the Lugduni-Vienne edition.

See also lot 808 for the English translation of Ptolemy's Geographia.(A ). Estimate: $1,600.00 - $1,900.00

goto detail pageNO RESERVE - Early Example of Ortelius' Map of the Arctic with Mythical Islands

Lot 519.  (Septentrionalium Regionum Descrip. ), Ortelius, ca. 1572 . Ortelius based this influential map on the work of earlier authorities including Mercator, Zeno, and Magnus. Of particular interest are the mythical islands of Brasil, Frisland, Drogeo, Icaria, and St. Brendan. Part of Mercator's imaginary polar continent is depicted with a Latin note that it is inhabited by pygmies. Iceland (Islant, Thule) is basically unchanged from Mercator's map of Europe from 1554 with the shape originated by Zeno. Greenland is separated from Europe by a wide sea and a portion of North America appears in the upper left corner with the name Estotilant. The map is adorned with a variety of very inventive creatures including a half-man, half-sea creature playing a lute. This is the first state with German text on verso, published in 1572 or 1573.

See also lot 812 for two reference books on Ortelius and his atlas maps.(B ). Estimate: $1,500.00 - $1,800.00

goto detail pageOne of the Earliest Obtainable Maps of Arabia

Lot 665.  ([Title on Verso] Tabula Sexta Asiae Complectitur Arabam Felicem, & Carmaniam), Ptolemy/Fries, [1541 ]. This fine woodblock is an early Ptolemaic map of the Arabian Peninsula here called Arabia Felix. It is a fairly good representation of the peninsula, although Ptolemy overestimated the width of the southern part of the peninsula and distorted the shape of the Arabian Gulf. The map is presented on a trapezoidal projection with parallels and meridians (forerunners of lines of longitude and latitude) enumerated in the borders. The title appears on verso along with Latin text. Laurent Fries produced the woodblocks for this edition of Ptolemy's Geography in a reduced version of the Waldseemuller maps from the 1513 edition.

See also lot 808 for the English translation of Ptolemy's Geographia.(A ). Estimate: $900.00 - $1,100.00

goto detail pageReserve Reduced $250! Magnificent Carte-a-Figures Map of Asia in Full Original Color

Lot 671.  (Asia Noviter Delineata), Blaeu, ca. 1643 . This is one of the most famous 17th century maps of the continent of Asia. It is surrounded in a beautiful carte-a-figures border and is richly ornamented with animals, sea monsters and sailing ships. The eastern coastline of Asia is severely truncated, Korea is shown as an island, and Japan is depicted on the Ortelius-Teixeira model. The Indian subcontinent is too narrow and the islands of Indonesia are very sketchy. A large island labeled Ceiram probably represents the western part of New Guinea. In the interior, the Caspian Sea is oriented on an east-west axis and there are several large erroneous lakes in China including the mythical Chiamay Lacus. The frieze across the top features vignettes of the cities of Candy, Calecut, Goa, Damascus, Jerusalem, Hormuz, Banten, Aden and Macao. The inclusion of Banten reflects the emergence of the Dutch as a major commercial power in the East Indies. The side panels flanking the map depict costumed figures of the various Asian peoples. French text on verso, published between 1643-45.(B+ ). Estimate: $3,750.00 - $4,500.00

goto detail pageEarly Dutch Map Featuring Chiamai Lacus

Lot 710.  (India Orientalis), Hondius, [1630 ]. This distinctive map is one of the earliest Dutch maps to focus on the region covering the Indian peninsula, through Burma and Thailand, to the Philippines and extending to the tip of the Malaysian peninsula with parts of Borneo and Sumatra. Elegantly engraved with a wave-patterned sea, a galleon, a sampan, and a sea monster. Inland the dominate feature is the mythical Chiamai Lacus, from which five rivers flow, and two other spurious lakes in central China. One of the most interesting and unusual features of the Malay peninsula is its dissection in two, the southern part becoming an island just south of Malacca. Further embellished with three fine strapwork cartouches. Latin text on verso.(A ). Estimate: $2,400.00 - $3,000.00

goto detail pageA Cornerstone Map of Africa

Lot 712.  (Africae Tabula Nova), Ortelius, 1570 . This striking map is one of the cornerstone maps of Africa and remained the standard map of Africa well into the seventeenth century. It was designed by Ortelius from elements of contemporary maps by Gastaldi, Mercator, and Forlani and used several recent sources: Ramusio in Navigationi et Viaggi (1550), Joao de Barros in Decadas da Asia (1552), and Leo Africanus in Historiale description de l'Afrique (1556). The majority of the nomenclature is taken from Gastaldi. The Nile is based on the Ptolemaic concept, originating from two large lakes south of the equator. Curiously Ortelius did not represent the Mountains of the Moon (a prominent feature on most prior maps) and the twin lakes are not named. Ortelius introduced two important changes to the shape of the continent on this map; the Cape of Good Hope is more pointed, and the eastward extension of the continent was reduced significantly. The map is decorated with a strapwork title cartouche, a grand sea battle (copied from Diego Gutierez' wall map of the Americas), and sea monsters. The presence of the ghost monster is barely visible in the sea off the Arabian peninsula. This beautiful map was engraved by Frans Hogenberg who engraved many of the maps for the Theatrum. This is the first state. Latin text on verso.

See also lot 812 for two reference books on Ortelius and his atlas maps.(B+ ). Estimate: $1,500.00 - $1,800.00

goto detail pageThe Earliest Printed Map to Focus on the North Pacific

Lot 732.  (Tartariae sive Magni Chami Regni Typus), Ortelius, [1603 ]. This extremely decorative map is important for several reasons and therefore becomes a foundation map for a variety of collection subjects.

It is the earliest printed map to focus on the North Pacific and the Stretto di Anian. Ortelius' depiction increased public awareness of Gastaldi's theory of a strait between the continents of Asia and America. It also includes a very early depiction of Japan, which is shown as a huge group of islands taking up nearly the entire North Pacific and located equal distance from both Asia and America. A notation reveals that Japan, called Zipangri by Marco Polo and also Chryse, was once attacked by the great Khan.

It is also one of the earliest (obtainable) maps to depict Northwestern America and to name California (C. Califormio). Six of the mythical Seven Cities of Cibola are located in the present-day Southwestern United States. This information was derived from reports of the ill-fated expedition of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado in 1541.

The map was designed to illustrate the expansive Kingdom of the Great Khan in Asia, which according to Ortelius is bounded by the river Ob, Lake Kataia, the Volga, the Caspian Sea, the river Chesel, the mountains of Usson, the area of Tibet, the river Caromora and the Morning Ocean.

The map was beautifully engraved by Frans Hogenberg and is filled with decoration including two encampments of Tartars, sailing ships, a flying fish and two elaborate strapwork cartouches. This is the third state with Latin text on verso.

See also lot 809 for Wagner's 2-volume reference work on the northwest coast of America, and lot 812 for two reference books on Ortelius and his atlas maps..(B+ ). Estimate: $950.00 - $1,200.00

goto detail pageHavell Edition Audubon Engraving

Lot 750.  (Shore Lark, Alauda Alpestris), Audubon, 1837 . This original aquatint is Plate 200 from the double-elephant folio Havell edition of Audubon’s great work on American ornithology, which is the most important ornithological work produced in America. The complete work was produced in less than 200 copies. Audubon traveled throughout the U.S. and recorded 435 life-size images of every native bird in the country, depicting them in natural poses in their native habitats. This engraving depicts several Shore Larks (now commonly known as Horned Larks), including a male and a female in summer plumage, a male in winter plumage, and three young chicks. Audubon drew three young Shore Larks during a trip to Labrador in the summer of 1833. Engraved, printed and hand colored by Robert Havell. The papermaker's watermark "J. Whatman 1837" is in the bottom left corner of the sheet. The full sheet measures 32-3/8 x 25-1/16".(A ). Estimate: $1,400.00 - $1,700.00

goto detail pageRuth Taylor's Pictorial Atlas & Brochure

Lot 790.  ([Lot of 2] Our U.S.A. - A Gay Geography [and] United Air Lines - A Gay Geography of the Main Line Airway), White, ca. 1938 . A. Our U.S.A. - A Gay Geography, published 1938 (13.0 x 9.5"). Ruth Taylor White's charming pictorial maps are among the most popular collectible maps of the early 20th century. These whimsical maps, often known as cartographs, combine graphic style, color and comical observation. This atlas contains 52 out of 54 of these humorous maps of the states and territories on heavy paper (missing the United States and West Virginia). While the maps do show the stereotypes of the day, they are nonetheless memorable because of it. Shortly after the publication of the first edition in 1935, the New York Times reviewed it as follows: "Any one who remembers his childhood efforts to visualize Kentucky as something more than the green spot on the map, or New York as the pink State, will appreciate this volume. Brilliantly colored pictorial maps of the same order which have been amusing adults for the past decade show the United States and their Territories as active, picturesque entities" (November 17th, 1935). Oblong quarto, hardbound in red cloth with endpapers depicting the hemispheres. Published in Boston by Little, Brown and Company. Condition: Condition code is for the maps which are clean and bright with vivid colors. The only exception is the map of Hawaii which has a small edge tear at top that just enters the map image. Text has pleasant light toning. The hinges are starting and the text block is a little loose. Covers have light staining and soiling. (A)

B. United Air Lines - A Gay Geography of the Main Line Airway, circa 1938 (20 x 10.5"). This colorful 16 page brochure features ten distinctive pictographic maps by Ruth Taylor. The maps detail the air trails across the United States as flown by United Airlines in the late 1930's. Each map is densely filled with Taylor's playful images describing industry and activities in the area. The dimensions given are for each two-page spread as this is the layout employed in the brochure. The dramatic cover is in bold red and black with art deco titling. The newly created Boulder Dam (September 1935) is shown suggesting a publication date in the late 1930's. Passengers were given this brochure as a souvenir of their flight in the innovative DC-3 aircraft. Condition: Near fine. (A)(A ). Estimate: $800.00 - $1,000.00



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